Re: Panic

I have a panic room in my head and it works the opposite of a safe haven. I’ve never seen a film style panic room; where actors portraying people victimized by home invaders find sanctuary. My panic room is a room in my mind. My panic room must have doors and windows to let fresh air in. I’m only there because I have been stifled by repeating thoughts that whirl me into a panic response. My panic room door must not be locked for then a key may be lost, the key to understanding how I got there in the first place, even if the key is found the latch may be corroded, the knob broken, a sealed room of past hurts will continue to mildew with dark mold teeming with disease. No confidence can be regained whilst in the panic room of my mind.

I once helped a student take the moment necessary to come out of his panic room. Something triggered him to rise beside his desk. I called his name. He had the posture of a cornered animal. He started towards the door, tripping and falling to the floor. Students quieted as he lay there, eyes darting. It was not a seizure but some strange force had seized him. Taking advantage of his stillness I moved beside him and placed my palm lightly over his heart. His breathing calmed and his classmates remained breathless. He looked at me. He sat up. I asked his friend to accompany him to the office so the secretary could call his parents. He left for the day. It wasn’t until year’s end that he mentioned the incident and thanked me. I told him I would always remember what happened as though I had been guided: The right person, in the right place, at the right time.

I most feel panic when things seem out of order. My way seems barred. Access is being denied. I feel trapped, painted into corner, claustrophobic, breathless, suffocated. In the midst of this anxiety attack I feel there is no way out, yet why I enter there in the first place is always a mystery to me. I don’t know the why of panic’s approach, yet I’m getting better at the how of waving it goodbye.

A Yoga instructor once advised me to see disagreeable thoughts as flowing through and not lingering. Deep breathing helps. Calm may be the opposite of panic. I like the way some pronounce calm with a noticeable ‘l’. When stressed I will linger with the middle section of the word repeatedly sounding it out as ‘c-ah-m’. I’ve developed strategies as I’ve aged to minimize the risk of entering into a panic response. I have medicine that brings comfort when needed. Just knowing it’s there in the cabinet is often enough for relief. I’ve learned to visualize safe places; like a verandah with a swing. Peace is found there, sitting for a spell with a cooling lemonade, taking time to gather my thoughts, settling me into a fresh perspective.

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catchmydrift.blog

I have written for The Daily Press, now retired, I still call myself a writer. My blog postings are a way to stretch my thoughts, reach out to the world, offer an opinion and record my passage. I take joy in words as Art. They can evoke powerful visions. I see life as a celebration. Like all humans I am complex and curious even while some have called me conventional. I practise a self invented philosophy: 'Awelogy'. It's a work in progress just like me. I love finding out what others think on this site or in my Twitter world @wh0n0z. Let's have a virtual conversation.

4 thoughts on “Re: Panic”

  1. Is panic anticipation rather than reaction. If so, is it not being able to see within oneself – seeing what isn’t.
    Is panic common to all species?
    Nice article Robert…

    Like

    1. a thoughtful response John- I’ll lean towards anticipation since that would explain why I never can determine where my panic comes from- also it relates to your 2nd point- I’d bet that humans are unique to anxiety since in the ‘natural’ world animals react to situations rather than stress over what might be eh?

      Like

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